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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Fire Statistics in America & Tips To Keep Anaheim Residents Safe

2/23/2016 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Statistics in America & Tips To Keep Anaheim Residents Safe Top left is a commercial fire kitchen fire, then the remaining three are house fires.

Every year homes, churches and office buildings catch fire. The numbers of reasons are endless as to why. Whether intentional or by accident, the statics for fires in America has been increasingly higher each year. Per www.nfpa.org (National Fire Protection Agency), the statistics below show the 2014 year (2015 has to be collected) for what is at cost when a fire occurs.

In 2014, there were 1,298,000 fires reported in the United States. These fires caused 3,275 civilian deaths, 15,775 civilian injuries, and $11.6 billion in property damage.

  • 494,000 were structure fires, causing 2,860 civilian deaths, 13,425 civilian injuries, and $9.8 billion in property damage.

  • 193,500 were vehicle fires, causing 345 civilian fire deaths, 1,450 civilian fire injuries, and $1.5 billion in property damage.

  • 610,500 were outside and other fires, causing 70 civilian fire deaths, 900 civilian fire injuries, and $237 million in property damage.

    Beyond the numbers of what fire cost, the frequency in which fire occurs is listed below, also cited from www.nfpa.org.

    The 2014 U.S. fire loss clock a fire department responded to a fire every 24 seconds. One structure fire was reported every 64 seconds.

  • One home structure fire was reported every 86 seconds.

  • One civilian fire injury was reported every 33 minutes.

  • One civilian fire death occurred every 2 hours and 41 minutes.

  • One outside and other fire was reported every 52 seconds.

  • One highway vehicle fire was reported every 3 minutes 8 seconds.

    So now that we know the numbers that affect us in America, what can we do to decrease such statistics listed above? For starters, having the knowledge of how to identify the risk of potential fires will help everyone stop a fire before it starts.

  • If outdoors, keep dry brush away from camping fires or BBQs. When done, be sure to water down any flames or embers that were burning, even if they have stopped smoking. Always keeping abucket of water nearby would be wise as well.

  • Keep front lawns and bushes cut to reduce potential fire hazards. Just because California is in a drought and we are limiting water, doesn’t mean you should let the wild brown grass or bushes grown wildly.

  • Home rooftops and exterior attic vents with metal wire mesh should be checked seasonally at the very least.

  • If driving a vehicle, pull over as quickly as possible, turn off the engine, get everyone out of the car and move at least 100 feet from the vehicle. Call 911 right away.

  • If indoors, keep plants and loose cloths/curtains aware from fire places, gas stoves and candles. Any open flame is a risk for a potential fire. Have a small fire extinguisher in the kitchen, garage, and hall closet to be extra safe.

  • Make sure that those around you know how to use a fire extinguisher.

  • Have an escape plan. Whether outdoors or inside, always plan an escape route in case a fire should occur. Two story homes could be just as dangerous as an open field. Keep in mind that fires can spread quickly and are more often than not, unpredictable. Inside a home or office can spread just as quickly as being in an open field and then being surrounded by flames.

  • Know how to read if a closed door is a safe exit away from fire or if it just a barrier between you and further flames. Place a hand on the door. If it is warm or bloated, it isn’t safe. If it is cool, it is ok to go through and should be closed behind you. Every door when leaving a fire should be closed behind you if possible.

  • Keep fire alarms operational and frequently check the batteries. If an alarm goes off, leave the premises immediately. If you must exit through smoke, sty low and crawl to your nearest exit. Each room should always have two escape routes.

  • Never use elevators if you live in a high rise apartment complex or are at a hotel. Stairs will be your go to in order to leave a building. 

There will be times we won’t be able to avoid fires, accidents do happen. If that is the case, once everyone is safe, let us come help you get everything back to like it never even happened. SERVPRO has years experience in a variety of fire claims. From natural disasters involving lightening storms to electrical fires to fireworks and Christmas Trees taking over a person’s home, we have seen it all and we know how to help. Contact your local SERVPRO straight away.

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